Getting started
Escape
Escape Inventory

 Templates and Downloads

When you’re installing and setting up software you often have to download a package or template a file. Because these tasks are so common Escape provides built-in support for both.

Templating

Templates are files that serve as starting points for other files. They are most often used when some kind of configuration file needs to be generated for a service or application.

Escape supports the Mustach templating language out of the box and integrates it into the build and deployment processes. We can define Templates in the Escape plan:

name: quickstart/hello-world
version: 0.0.@

inputs:
- id: who
  default: World
  type: string
  description: Who should we be greeting?

templates:
- file: my_template.txt.tpl
  target: my_template.txt

Templates are rendered as part of the build and deployment steps, but they can be scoped as well (see deploy_templates and build_templates in the plan). If my_template.txt.tpl would look like this:

Hello, {{who}}!

After building or deploying the file my_template.txt should look like this:

Hello, World!

Template Mapping

Sometimes we need to give the template more variables that are not directly available in our parent release, or we have to mangle the ones that are. For example, we could have something like this:

{{greeting}}, {{who}}!

In those cases we can explicitly set up a variable mapping:

name: quickstart/hello-world
version: 0.0.@

inputs:
- id: who
  default: World
  type: string
  description: Who should we be greeting?

templates:
- file: my_template.txt.tpl
  target: my_template.txt
  mapping:
    greeting: "Alright"

We can also use Escape Script in the value fields. In fact, behind the scenes, Escape adds a variable mapping for all the parent’s variables (unless you override it in the mapping). You can see this when running escape plan preview on an Escape plan that uses a template:

   "templates": [
      {
         "file": "config.toml.tpl",
         "target": "config.toml",
         "scopes": [
            "build"
         ],
         "mapping": {
            "branch": "$this.branch",
            "description": "$this.description",
            "docker_cmd": "$this.inputs.docker_cmd",
            "docker_email": "$this.inputs.docker_email",
            ...

So Escape gives us a neat way to reuse our release’s input variables for configuration files.

Downloads

Downloads are defined in the Escape Plan and are performed during the build and deployment steps:

name: quickstart/hello-world
version: 0.0.@

inputs:
- id: who
  default: World
  type: string
  description: Who should we be greeting?

downloads:
- url: https://example.com/some-archive.tgz
  dest: some-archive.tgz

Unpacking Downloads

Escape can be told to automatically unpack downloaded packages, which is often the first thing you want to do. Escape supports this feature on .zip, .tgz, .tar.gz and .tar extensions.

name: quickstart/hello-world
version: 0.0.@

inputs:
- id: who
  default: World
  type: string
  description: Who should we be greeting?

downloads:
- url: https://example.com/some-archive.tgz
  dest: some-archive.tgz
  unpack: true

Skipping Downloads

We can also tell Escape to skip the download and unpack step if a particular file already exists (glob patterns are also supported here):

name: quickstart/hello-world
version: 0.0.@

inputs:
- id: who
  default: World
  type: string
  description: Who should we be greeting?

downloads:
- url: https://example.com/some-archive.tgz
  dest: some-archive.tgz
  unpack: true
  if_not_exists:
  - some-binary

There are a few more options on Downloads, which you can find in the reference documentation.